Sunday, 17 November 2013

On Writing an Award Scroll

On Writing an Award Scroll, Part One:
Non-literary Sources

By THLaird Colyne Stewart,
for the First Ealdormerean Queen’s Prize Tourney, October 2013

Sponsored by Her Excellency Mahault of Swynford

Introduction

I am here-in going to showcase the three most recent award scrolls I have written as an example of how to do some quick preliminary research on the recipient and to show how my source material influenced my writing.

How to Find Sources On-line

Google search is your friend, though a current project I am working on (The Scriptorium) has begun to gather links to resources which house rolls, charters, poetry, and other period documents (more on this later).

If you are going to start from scratch, try searching for words such as: medieval literature, medieval texts, medieval writing, medieval roll, medieval charter, and so forth.

Researching the Recipient

If you are lucky, when an assignment comes from the Trillium Signet it will include the recipient’s persona. Sometime though, you’re not so lucky. In those instance my first stop is the Ealdormere Wiki to see if they have an entry. If they don’t I try a Google search of their name. This has led me to interesting incidental information that I can work into a scroll, such as that a recipient loves making cheese. If that is a dead end I try Google searching for each aspect of their name, to try and at least identify what region their persona was from.

If all that fails, I contact their local Baron and/or Baroness, who often know—or can find out—their persona.

Documents Used in Period

There were several written documents in period that can be used as inspiration for writing SCA award scroll. They include:

  • Assizes: a decree or edict rendered at a court session
  • Charters: a grant of authority or rights, allowing the recipient to exercise those rights
  • Chronicles: written histories, such as Froissart’s Chronicles
  • Concessions of Arms: documents granting heraldry
  • Constitutions
  • Declarations: a judgment of the court
  • Decrees: a rule of law issued by a head of state
  • Laws
  • Letters: personal correspondence
  • Letters Patent: a written order granting an office, right or title
  • Masses
  • Ordinances: a law made by a local authority
  • Papal Bulls: a letters patent or charter issued by the pope
  • Poems
  • Prayers
  • Rolls: a term for written records
  • Statutes
  • Treaties

How Documents Were Dated

Medieval documents could be dated in any number of ways. In Medieval England the common convention was to specify a week day and/or a nearby religious feast day, and the year of the current monarch’s reign.

One example is the Confirmation of the Charters (1297) which was dated:

Given at Ghent the fifth day of November in the twenty-fifth year of our reign.

A second example is the Treaty at Aix Between Louis II and Charles the Bald Concerning the Division of the Kingdom of Lothar II A.D.:

In the year of the Incarnation of our Lord Jesus Christ 870, on the day before the Nones of March, in the 32nd year of the most glorious king Charles…

We can replicate this by using a feast day instead of the modern day (such as the Feast of St. Parternus instead of April 15), and using the SCA’s convention of dating years. (That is, Anno Societatus—or Year of the Society—which counts up from May 1, 1966.) As long as something identifiable as the day, month and year the award was handed out are included, the scroll will be official (see next section).

A third example comes from the Constitutions of Clarendon (1164) which begins:

In the year 1164 from the Incarnation of our Lord, in the fourth year of the papacy of Alexander, in the tenth year of the most illustrious king of the English, Henry II…

In an award scroll I wrote for Gerhard of Caldrithig, I replicated this convention as follows:

In the year 48 from the Incarnation of our Society, in the fifteenth year of the Lupine Kingdom, in the first month of the most illustrious king and queen of the North, Nigel and Adrielle…


The date and month were noted in the last line of the scroll to allow for full proper dating.

Mandatory Information on SCA Award Scrolls

For an award to be official, it must contain certain information. Failure to include this information may result in the award’s validity being questioned. This information includes:

  • The name of the Royals bestowing the award
  • The recipient’s full SCA name
  • The full name of the award being given
  • The reason the award is being given (such as for service, skill in the arts, etc.)
  • The date the award is given
  • The location of the event where the award is given

Though the Ealdormere Scribal College website states that the date must also appear in a modern format, this is not standard practice. In fact, the Suggested Wordings given on the same site do not include modern dates.

Anatomy of a Scroll

The wordings on SCA Award scrolls are made up of certain sections, which are fairly standard from one kingdom to another, Though exactly what sections are used (and in which order they are used) may vary slightly from kingdom to kingdom, the end results are still remarkably similar. The sections listed below are to be found in all standard award texts in every kingdom EXCEPT the Affirmation, which is only used in certain kingdoms (and even in those kingdoms, it is not necessarily used on every award).

  • The Address, or opening, proclaims to the populace the impending action,
  • The Intitulation contains the name(s) of the monarch(s) who are bestowing the award,
  • The Notification and Exposition state the reason for the action being proclaimed,
  • The Disposition names the recipient, the award and the reason they are receiving it,
  • The Blazon and Emblazon (words and depiction) of the Arms (on those occasions when Arms are given),
  • The Corroboration affirms the action,
  • The Location and Date (many kingdoms include the modern year as well),
  • The Royal signature block,
  • Affirmation and Herald’s signature block

Here is an example of an award scroll I wrote, broken into these sections (except for the blazon and emblazon, as the recipient already had Arms, and the Affirmation, which is not used in my kingdom):

[Address]: TO ALL AND SINGULAR as well Nobles and Gentles as others to whom these presents shall come [Intitulation]: from Trumbrand and Kaylah, King and Queen of the realm of Ealdormere, that stretches from Lacus Ealdormearc in the South to the reaches of the Far North, and from Lacus Pentamerus in the West to the borders of the Kingdom of the East, send greetings in our Grace everlasting.

[Notification and Exposition]: WHEREAS anciently from the beginning the valiant and virtuous acts of worthy persons have been commended to the world with sundry monuments and remembrances of their good deserts. [Disposition]: Amongst these stands the Award of the Orion, which was devised in the beginning to recognize the skill of artisans.

AND being deserved, Ysabeau D’Comport, in the region of the Rising Waters, is hereby so recognized for her skill in the research of clothing and the culinary arts and granted said Award of the Orion.

[Corroboration]: IN WITNESS WHEROF We Trumbrand and Kaylah have set hereunto Our hand, and seal, [Location and Date]: this [ ] day of [ ] in the year of the Society 48, while sitting our Thrones at the Pennsic War.

[Signatures Block]

Sometimes part of the Location or Date may come as part of the address, or part of the Disposition (such as the recipient’s name) may be included in the Notification. It doesn’t really matter as long as all the required information is present.

A Look at the Writing of Three Scrolls

Scroll the First: Orla O'shannahan, Award of the Orion, 2013

Luckily, Orla had an entry in the Ealdormere wiki which described her persona as a Viking living in Ireland in the 11th century, as well as details on her endeavours in the arts and sciences.

Though a bit outside her time period I settled on the Assize of Clarendon, 1166 as my source material. For some reason it jumped out to me when perusing the Avalon Project online.

Below are the two sections of the Assize that I drew on:

1. In the first place the aforesaid king Henry, by thee counsel of all his barons, for the preservation of peace and the observing of justice, has decreed that an inquest shall be made throughout the separate counties, and throughout the separate hundreds, through twelve of the more lawful men of the hundred, and through four of the more lawful men of each township, upon oath that they will speak the truth: whether in their hundred or in their township there be any man who, since the lord king has been king, has been charged or published as being a robber or murderer or thief; or any one who is a harbourer of robbers or murderers or thieves. And the Justices shall make this inquest by themselves, and the sheriffs by themselves.

8. The lord king wills also that all shall come to the county courts to take this oath; so that no one shall rem main away, on account of any privilege that he has, or of a court or soc that he may have, from coming to take this oath

For the date I choose to represent October 26th as the Feast Day of St. Alfred the Great as he was a patron of the art.

Scroll Wording:

1. In the first place the king Nigel and his queen Adrielle, by thee counsel of all his barons, for the preservation of peace and the observing of justice, has decreed that an inquest shall be made throughout the separate counties, and throughout the separate hundreds, through twelve of the more lawful men of the hundred, and through four of the more lawful men of each township, upon oath that they will speak the truth: whether in their hundred or in their township there be any person who, since the lord king has been king, has not been recognized for their skill in the arts and sciences.

2. And in the case of a person who has not been recognized for their skill, they will be so recognized.

3. And let it be known that the barons and lawful men having named such a person, will have that person so recognized.

4. And further let is be known that such a person is Orla O’shannahan who was shown great aptitude in the fields of jewelry making, metal smithing, dancing, fiber arts, vinting, and weaving.

5. The lord king and queen therefore wish to bestow upon Orla O’shannahan an Award of the Orion.

6. And let it be recorded that such was done on the Feast Day of St. Alfred the Great, in the Shire of Trinovantia Nova, in the year AS48.

Scroll the Second: Marrin von Waldburg, Award of the Maiden’s Heart, 2013

As with Orla, Marrin had an entry in the Ealdormere wiki. Her persona is German, living in 1235. I again went to the Avalon Project and found Count Palatinate as Judge Over the Kings, Decree of the Nuremberg Diet, November 19, 1274 which is from her area and close to her time period.

The section of text I used as inspiration is quoted below:

In public consistory, at the time of the solemn and royal court held at Nuremberg, the princes and a brilliant assembly of counts and barons being in session, and a very great multitude of nobles and commoners standing before the most serene lord Rudolph king of the Romans for the purpose of exhibiting the fulness of justice to each person, the king first asked that it be defined by a decree who ought to be judge if the king of the Romans should have to bring any charge against any prince of the empire in the matter of imperial possessions and those belonging to the fist, and concerning other injuries inflicted on the realm or on the king. And it was defined by all the princes and barons who were present, that the count Palatine of the Rhine has held of old, and does hold, the right of judging in processes which the emperor or king wishes to bring against a prince of the empire.

The said count Palatine, therefore, presiding over the tribunal, the king asked that it be first established by a decree what he, the king, might and should, according to law, do with the possessions which the former emperor Frederick had and held, peacefully and quietly, before the sentence of deposition was passed upon him by the princes; and also concerning possessions otherwise falling to the empire, which possessions others hold, occupying them through violence. And it was decreed that the king him self, in the matter of all such possessions, ought to assert his own claim, and bring back those same possessions into his power; and if any one should presume to oppose himself to the king in the recovering of such possessions, the king should repel with the royal power such hurtful violence, and to preserve the rights of the empire.....

For the date, I used the feast day of Witta of Büraburg to represent October 26 as Witta was also German.

Scroll wording:

In public consistory, at the time of the solemn and royal court held at Trinovantia Nova, the dukes and a brilliant assembly of counts and barons being in session, and a very great multitude of nobles and commoners standing before the most serene lord Nigel king of the Ealdormereans and the exhaulted queen Adrielle, for the purpose of exhibiting the fulness of justice to each person, their majesties first asked that it be defined by a decree who ought to be recognized for their service to the crown. And it was defined by all the dukes and barons who were present, that Marrin von Waldburg had long and tirelessly so served and should be so recognized.

That said Marrin therefore was presented with an Award of the Maiden’s Heart on the feast day of Witta of Büraburg. And it was decreed that she could bear the badge of that award without hindrance or let. This was done in the year of the society forty-eight.

Scroll the Third: Zarek Guey, Award of the Scarlet Banner, 2013

Luckily the Trillium Signet let me know Zarek had a Roman persona, since he did not have an entry in the Ealdormere wiki and web searching his name did not bring up any results. I was able to verify though that Guey was a Roman name (and also a bad word in Spanish).

Though I usually consult different sources for my inspiration, this time I again went to the Avalon Project and found Edicts of Augustus and Decree of the Senate on the Judicial Process in Cyrene, 64 B.C. 

The sections I used as inspiration were:

Emporer Caesar Augustus, pontifex maximus, holding the tribunician power for the seventeenth time, saluted imperator for the fourteenth time, proclaims:

Since I find that in the province of Cyrene there are altogether 215 Roman citizens of every age whose census rating is 2,500 denarii or more, and that the jurors are drawn from this number in which several cliques are known to exist, and since the delegations coming from the cities of the province have complained that these cliques are unfair to Greeks in capital crimes, when the same people act as prosecutors and as witnesses for each other in turn, and since I myself have learned that some innocent persons have been overwhelmed in this way and have suffered the death penalty, until the Senate decides on this point or I myself find some better remedy, it appears to me that the governors of Crete and Cyrene will do wisely and fittingly, if they appoint in the province of Cyrene an equal number of jurors from both Greeks and Romans of greatest wealth and not less than twenty-five years of age, having a census rating and property of not less than 7,500 denarii, if a sufficient number of such men can be found, or, if the number of jurors to be placed on the album cannot be provided in this way, they shall post as jurors citizens who have the half of this amount of wealth and not less than half to sit on capital cases involving Greeks.

For the date of October 26 I found a Roman holiday that began that day. Since the original wording dealt with land holdings, I wrote that Zarek would be granted land. I therefore asked the Trillium Signet to run the wording past Their Majesties, to make sure this would be alright with them, and also suggested that Magistra Nicolaa de Bracton translate the wording into Latin as that would fit Zarek’s persona better than English. Unfortunately, land cannot be granted on an AoA level award, so I had to remove that section (in brackets).

Scroll wording:

King Nigel MacFarlane and Queen Adrielle Kerrec, supreme pontiffs, holding the throne for the second time, proclaim:

Since We find that in the Shires of Trinovantia Nova and the March of St. Martins there is an Ealdormerean citizen who has long proven himself on the field of battle, and since We have learned that this citizen’s service by strength-of-arms has not been recognized, We adorn Zarek Guey with a Scarlet Banner [as well as property of not less than 7, 500 denarii]. This We do at Our Crown Tournament, in Anno Societatus 48, on the first day of Ludi Victoriae Sullanae.



Sources

The Avalon Project, http://avalon.law.yale.edu/

Catholic Online: Saints and Angels, http://www.catholic.org/saints/

Ealdormere Scribal College, http://scribal.wolfium.com



Some Notes on Medieval English Genealogy: Chronology and Dating, http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/guide/chron.shtml




Appendix: Other Examples of Award Scrolls based on Period Writings

Rois Inse Fhinne, Award of the Maiden’s Heart, 2013

`TWILL ALL AND SINDRIE quhome it efferis quhais knawlege thir Pntis salcum Greting In god evirlesting We Trumbrand, King, and Kaylah, Queen, with our herauldis of the realme of Ealdormere being requirit be the richt honorable Rois Inse Fhinne to assigne and gif unto her sic awarde of the maiden’s hirt as become us of our office to do QUHAIRFORE we having respect to thais thingis that appertenit hes assignit and assignis to her permission to display the badge of said awarde, being quaterlie azure and or, a heart counterchanged. We testifie be oure seile of office is appensit At Finely Oaks the Eighteenth Day of august the zeir of society forty and eight.

Based on Patent of Arms to John Maxwell lord Herries, 1567

`TWILL ALL AND SINDRIE quhome it efferis quhais knawlege thir Pntis salcum Greting In god evirlesting We Shir Robert forman of Luthrie Knicht Lyoun King of armes with our brithir herauldis of the realme of Scotland being requirit be the richt honorable johnne lord maxwell of hereiss to assigne and gif unto him sic armes In mettaill and culloure as maist deulie suld appertene to him and his posteritie as become us of our office to do QUHAIRFORE we having respect to thais thingis that appertenit hes assignit and assignis to him quarterlie the first and thrid silver ane saulter sable with ane Lambeaw of thre feitt gulis secund and ferde silver thre hurtcheonis sable with the beraris of the scheilde helme Tymmerall and Detoufl as heirunder Is Depaintit quhilk he and his posteritie may lefullie beir without reproche Quhilk We testifie be thir Pntis Subscrivit be Marchemont hairauld our clerk of office quhairunto oure seile of office is appensit At Edinburgh the Secund Day of aprile the zeir of god ane thowsand fyve hundreth thre score sevin zeiris.


Constance of Caldrithig, Wain, 2012

Who is Constance of Caldrithig?

She is the Exchequer on the Privy Council.

And is that all that she is, and all that she does?

By no means. Also she has been a seneschal, both of her barony and her canton.

Is there not more she does for her barony?

Indeed. She has also served as its calendar secretary, tracking Their Lapine Excellencies’ schedule. As well, she is the barony’s camp cook who plans the menu, sets the budget, does the shopping and much of the cooking.

Has she not also organized events?

She has. She has been the event steward of Feast of the Hare more than once, as well as organized several other events. As well, she has held weekly meetings dedicated to the arts and sciences. She has also been heavily involved with recruitment of potential new members to the Society through demonstrations held at Osgoode and Upper Canada Village.

Should all this service not be recognized, my liege?

Indeed it should.

Therefore, all gentles and nobility, let it be known by all that We, Roak and Elizabeth, King and Queen of the Trillium lands of Ealdormere, in consideration of the most excellent service that Constance of Caldrithig has given, are minded to induct her as a Companion into Our noble Order of the Wain and give her the right to bear the badge of the Order. Furthermore do We bestow upon her a Grant of Arms and the right to bear her] arms with the crest of the Kingdom. Given by Our hands this [day] day of [month], anno societatis [year], at [event] in Our [group hosting event].

Based on the Dialogus de Scaccario, or Dialogue concerning the Exchequer, late 12th century, by Richard FitzNeal. http://avalon.law.yale.edu/medieval/excheq.asp

II.                 
Disciple. What is the exchequer?

Master. The exchequer is a quadrangular surface about ten feet in length, five in breadth, placed before those who sit around it in the manner of a table, and all around it it has an edge about the height of one's four fingers, lest any thing placed upon it should fall off. There is placed over the top of the exchequer, moreover, a cloth bought at the Easter term, not an ordinary one but a black one marked with stripes, the stripes being distant from each other the space of a foot or the breadth of a hand. In the spaces moreover are counters placed according to their values; about these we shall speak below. Although, moreover, such a surface is called exchequer, nevertheless this name is so changed about that the court itself which sits when the exchequer does is called exchequer; so that if at any time through a decree any thing is established by common counsel, it is said to have been done at the exchequer of this or that year. As, moreover, one says today "at the exchequer," so one formerly said " at the tallies."

D. What is the reason of this name ?

M. No truer one occurs to me at present than that it has a shape similar to that of a chess board.

D. Would the prudence of the ancients ever have called it so for its shape alone, when it might for a similar reason be called a table (tabularium) ?

M. I was right in calling thee painstaking. There is another, but a more hidden reason. For just as, in a game of chess, there are certain grades of combatants and they proceed or stand still by certain laws or limitations, some presiding and others advancing: so, in this, some preside, some assist by reason of their office, and no one is free to exceed the fixed laws; as will be manifest from what is to follow. Moreover, as in chess the battle is fought between kings, so in this it is chiefly between two that the conflict takes place and the war is waged, the treasurer, namely, and the sheriff who sits there to render account; the others sitting by as judges, to see and to judge.

D. Will the accounts be received then by the treasurer, although there are many there who, by reason of their power, are greater .

M. That the treasurer ought to receive the account from the sheriff is manifest from this, that the same is required from him whenever it pleases the king: nor could that be required of him which he had not received. Some say nevertheless, that the treasurer and the chamberlains should be bounden alone for what is written in the rolls in the treasury, and that for this an account should be demanded of them. But it is believed with more truth that they should be responsible for the whole writing of the roll, as will be readily understood from what is to follow.


Gerhard of Caldrithig, Orion, 2013

In the year 48 from the Incarnation of our Society, in the fifteenth year of the Lupine Kingdom, in the first month of the most illustrious king and queen of the North, Nigel and Adrielle, in the presence of those same monarchs, there is made this record of recognition of one of Their subjects, namely Gerhard of Caldrithig who is renowned for his musical talent. Indeed he is a treasured member of the Caldrithig Chior. For this reason and more do We therefore bestow upon him the Award of the Orion. May this honour be preserved by the heralds, and the lord king and queen, Their heirs, and the barons of the kingdom.

Done by Our hands this 28th day of September, in our Canton of Harrowgate Heath.

Based on the Constitutions of Clarendon, 1164.

In the year 1164 from the Incarnation of our Lord, in the fourth year of the papacy of Alexander, in the tenth year of the most illustrious king of the English, Henry II., in the presence of that same king, this memorandum or inquest was made of some part of the customs and liberties. and dignities of his predecessors, viz., of king Henry his grandfather and others, which ought to be observed and kept in the kingdom…

And may they be preserved to the holy church, and to the lord king, and to his heirs, and to the barons of the kingdom, and may they be inviolably observed for ever.


On Writing an Award Scroll, Part Two:
Literary Sources

By THLaird Colyne Stewart,
for the First Ealdormerean Queen’s Prize Tourney, October 2013

Sponsored by Her Excellency Mahault of Swynford

Introduction

Here-in I will examine how I used period literary sources (poems, prayers, and so forth) as inspiration when writing SCA award scrolls.

Sources

I always try to find a source that matches the recipient’s persona. For example, if their persona is Viking, I often go to the Sagas of the Icelanders. For details on researching a recipient’s persona and finding sources on-line, see part one of this article.

Method

I usually use a fragment of poetry or song to introduce the body of the scroll, though the entire scroll can be written in verse as long as all the necessary information required to make a scroll official is included. (For details on what information is required, see part one of this article.)

I try to keep my writing as close to the original text as possible when it comes to meter and rhyme scheme, though sometimes exceptions need to be made.

One of the first scrolls I wrote was a Maiden’s Heart for Baron Corwyn Galbraith, while he was the Baron of Septentria. Since he has an Irish persona, I chose Brian Ó Ruairc, mo rogha leannán (Brian O'Roarke, my chosen darling)” by Fearghal Óg Mhac an Bhaird as my source material. The poem reads:

Brian Ó Ruairc, my chosen darling,
gentle enough at the bestowal of a jewel;
and hard enough in an enclosure of slim spears,
the nut from the cluster of the Gael of the Gréag.

Another Murchadh mac Brian, a salmon of the Shannon --
Í Ruairc has a likeness to Te's Fort --
or Niall Caille who did not refuse one man,
his face's _____ cliff.

King of Calraighe of the numerous raids,
and also of Tara; plow of Niall;
two words from Bearchán's mouth;
and king on the old plains of Banba -- Brian.

My wording based on this was:

Corwyn Galbraith, the aiding Raven,
Gentle enough at the bestowal of rings;
And hard enough when upon the fields;
The bear from the gate of the Skelder.

Baron Corwyn, the worker,
Serving always, his king and crown,
Like the maiden he will not say no
When work there is to be done.

Master Corwyn, of the numerous skills,
Chef and cook, steward and baron,
Most worthy of the northern folk,
I bow to him in honour.

The first stanza is the closest to the original material. The words in the second and third stanzas don’t resemble each other when it comes to the actual words, but I tried to keep the same rhythm and meter.

One example of a scroll I wrote completely in verse was another Maiden’s Heart, this one for Eleanor du Grismontes. I based her scroll on the Song of Dermot and the Earl (Chanson de Dermot et du comte):

1. [gap: text acephalous/extent: unknown]
By his own interpreter
Who told to me the history of him,
Of which I here make record.
This man was Morice Regan,
Face to face he spake to him
Who related this geste:
The history of him he showed me.
This Morice was interpreter
To King Dermot, who loved him much.
Here I shall leave off about the bachelor,
About King Dermot I will tell you.

2. In Ireland, at this day,
There was no more worthy king:
Very rich and powerful he was;
He loved the generous, he hated the mean.
He by his power
Had taken and conquered
O'Neil and Meath in his war;
Hostages he brought to Leinster:
He brought with him O'Carroll,
The son of the king of Uriel.

Eleanor’s scroll based on this read:

A great lady lives
In our Land of Ealdormere
We have heard the history of her,
Of which We here make record.
This lady was Eleanor du Grismontes,
Beloved of her canton,
She who serves at all times,
Her history We show you.
This Eleanor was Chatelaine
To the lands of Greyfells,
Also Keeper of the Gate,
About Eleanor We tell you.

In Ealdormere, at this day,
There is no more worthy person:
Very kind and giving is she;
And so We do reward her,
I, Nigel King, and I, Adrielle Queen,
Upon her place a Maiden’s Heart,
At the Feasting of the Hare,
In the Year of Our Society 48,
On All Souls Day.

This verse contains all the required information to make a scroll official: the recipient’s full name in line 5, the reason for the award in lines 7 through 12, the name of the award in line 18, the name of the Royals bestowing the award in line 17, a variation of the name of the event where the award was given in line 19, and the date in lines 20 and 21.



Sources:


Medieval Irish Poem Index, http://suburbanbanshee.net/irishptr/irepoems/brianoru.html
Appendix: Other Examples of Award Scrolls based on Period Literature

Katla the Firey, Wolfs Cub, 2012

All of the kingdom is held in awe
at Ealdormere’s youth here in this hall:
everyone lauds Katla the Firey,
both for her skill and for her finery.
Hear, see, read and understand that size and age are no hindrances to good service and a giving heart. There are children within the Lupine Kingdom of Ealdormere who have served beyond their years and set an example to others. Such a gentle is Katla the Firey, who has been attending events for ten years, engages in various arts and sciences activities culminating in her entrance into the Kingdom A&S Pentathlon this year. Therefore do We, Roak, King of Ealdormere, and Elizabeth, Our Queen by grace and inspiration, bestow upon her the Award of the Wolf's Cub this [day] day of [month], anno societatis [year], while sitting on Our thrones in Our [group hosting event] at [event].
Based on Gunnlaug’s poem as recited in “The Saga of Gunnlaug Serpent-tongue” (part 7), circa 1270-1300, as translated in The Sagas of the Icelanders, Viking Press, 2000.

All the army’s in awe and agog
at England’s good prince, as at God:
everyone lauds Ethlered the King,
both the warlike king’s race and men’s kin.


Bealdgar Thorbeornsson, Award of the Orion, 2012

Sure glad wood-shaper maketh
More skilled than any other;
O Tree amid Earth’s tree
Look at what he makes of thee!
No wood-shaper so adept is
That he may win look from me:
One man is so able,
And well beloved is he.

Proclaim throughout the realm that We, Rylyn, Queen of Ealdormere and Patroness of the Arts and Sciences, and Edward, Our King by right of arms, are right mindful of the skills in which Bealdgar Thorbeornsson has displayed in the art of wood-turning. Therefore do We wish to recognize him with Our Award of the Orion and give him the right to wear the badge of the award. Done by Our hands and seal this 25th day of August, anno societatis XLVII, while sitting on Our thrones in Our Canton of Bryniau Tywynnog, at Middle Ages on the Green.

Based on Olof Sunbeam’s song from The Saga of Viglund the Fair, 1901, English, transl. William Morris and Eiríkr Magnússon, from the original 'Víglundar saga', 10th or 11th century.

"Sure glad ring-warder singeth
Sweeter than any other;
O Voice amid Earth's voices
Henceforth but woe unto me!
No ring-warder so white is
That he may win look from me:
One man have I made oath for,
And well beloved is he."



Streonwald Wulfesbana, Order of Thorbjorn’s Hammer, 2012

LO, praise the prowess of Ealdormereans,
of spear-armed hlafords, in days hard lived,
we have heard, and what honour the northmen won!
Oft Streonwald Wulfesbana from defeated foes,
from many a kingdom, the mead-bench tore,
awing the earls. Never he rests,
always at battle, no weapon is foreign.
Famed is this Streonwald, far flies the boast of him,
son of the wolf, in the Scadian lands.
So comes to his great man, recognition of jarls,
from hands of the great king, called Edward,
and Queen Rylyn, come honours,
named as a Hammer,
Wielder of Wonder, this hall-sung hero.

Be it known that We, Edward, King, and Rylyn, Queen, do recognize the martial skill of Streonwald Wulfesbana and grant him entry into the Order of Thorbjorn’s Hammer. Done this [XX] day of [XX], Anno Societatis XLVII while in the Debated Lands at the Pennsic War.

Based on the prologue of Beowulf, c. 1000 CE, from a translation by McMaster University.

LO, praise of the prowess of people-kings
of spear-armed Danes, in days long sped,
we have heard, and what honor the athelings won!
Oft Scyld the Scefing from squadroned foes,
from many a tribe, the mead-bench tore,
awing the earls. Since erst he lay
friendless, a foundling, fate repaid him:
for he waxed under welkin, in wealth he throve,
till before him the folk, both far and near,
who house by the whale-path, heard his mandate,
gave him gifts: a good king he!
To him an heir was afterward born,
a son in his halls, whom heaven sent
to favor the folk, feeling their woe
that erst they had lacked an earl for leader
so long a while; the Lord endowed him,
the Wielder of Wonder, with world's renown.
Famed was this Beowulf:1 far flew the boast of him,
son of Scyld, in the Scandian lands.
So becomes it a youth to quit him well
with his father's friends, by fee and gift,
that to aid him, aged, in after days,
come warriors willing, should war draw nigh,
liegemen loyal: by lauded deeds
shall an earl have honor in every clan.
Forth he fared at the fated moment,
sturdy Scyld to the shelter of God.
Then they bore him over to ocean's billow,
loving clansmen, as late he charged them,
while wielded words the winsome Scyld,
the leader beloved who long had ruled....
In the roadstead rocked a ring-dight vessel,
ice-flecked, outbound, atheling's barge:
there laid they down their darling lord
on the breast of the boat, the breaker-of-rings,2
by the mast the mighty one. Many a treasure
fetched from far was freighted with him.
No ship have I known so nobly dight
with weapons of war and weeds of battle,
with breastplate and blade: on his bosom lay
a heaped hoard that hence should go
far o'er the flood with him floating away.
No less these loaded the lordly gifts,
thanes' huge treasure, than those had done
who in former time forth had sent him
sole on the seas, a suckling child.
High o'er his head they hoist the standard,
a gold-wove banner; let billows take him,
gave him to ocean. Grave were their spirits,
mournful their mood. No man is able
to say in sooth, no son of the halls,
no hero 'neath heaven, -- who harbored that freight!


Abal of the Burning Desert, AOA, 2012

O wild rose, pay heed! for tales of your deeds need telling!
Neither favour nor fortune did you seek, nor profit from the work of your hands,
Yet at foreign wars you gave great sustenance, to fighters you gave the gift of water,
How many fought on because of you! how can we let your name remain in obscurity!

We cannot.

Therefore, be it known that We, Roak, King by right of arms, and Elizaabeth, Our Queen, are minded to make Abal of the Burning Desert an Award of Arms in recognition of her service to Ealdormere, specifically for her services as a water bearer at several Pennsic Wars. We bestow upon her the right to bear arms within the Society for Creative Anachronism without let or hindrance from any person, and the rights and responsibilities conveyed by his/her elevation to this rank. Done this [Date] day of [Month], A.S. [Year], while sitting on Our thrones in Our [Place name], in testimony whereof We have set Our hand and seal.

Based on “The Story of the Fisherman” from Stories from the Thousand and One Nights, translated by Edward William Lane (NY: P.F. Collier & Son Company, 1909-14), revised by Stanley Lane-Poole (NY: Bartleby.com, 2001, http://www.bartleby.com/16/)

O angry fate, forbear! or, if thou wilt not forbear, relent!
Neither favour from fortune do I gain, nor profit from the work of my hands.
I came forth to seek my sustenance, but have found it to be exhausted.
How many of the ignorant are in splendor! and how many of the wise, in obscurity!




Galfrid the Thynne, Maidens Heart, 2012

Roasting meat that a cook doth please
Upon a spit of iron dear,
I vow that from over the Inland seas
Never have I tasted its peer.
Roast I this with softened cheese,
“Life is good,” I say with cheer,
For these things that tasting please
Under a sky blue and clear.
Alas! It is as I fear:
Many fighters I fed from my pot;
The food is gone, my mood is drear,
But tomorrow I cook again in this spot!

From our Lupine Thrones in Our [group hosting event] do We, Roak, King of Ealdormere by right of arms, and Elizabeth, by inspiration Our most gracious Queen, send greetings. Be it known that We do recognize the exemplary service of Galfrid the Thynne, who serves as pursuivant, event steward, exchequer and camp cook. We do here commend him and are pleased to bestow upon him the Award of the Maiden's Heart and the right to bear the badge of the award. Given this [day] day of [month], Anno Societatis [year], at [event], in testimony whereof We have set Our hands and seal.

Based on the poem Pearl (anonymous, circa 1400), as translated by J.R.R. Tolkien, in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl and Sir Orfeo, George Allen & Unwin Limited, 1975.

Pearl of delight that a prince doth please
To grace in gold enclosed so clear,
I vow that from over orient seas
Never proved I any price her peer.
So round, so radient ranged by these,
So fine, so smooth did her sides appear
That ever in judging gems that please
Her alone I deemed as dear.
Alas! I lost her in garden near:
Through grass to the ground from me it shot;
I pine now oppressed by love-wound drear
For that pearl, mine own, without a spot.


James Edgarson,  AOA, 2012

I know which offspring,
descendent of wolves,
I want to proclaim
--Edgar’s son is his name;
It is his habit
to fight in the vanguard:
Resurrecter
of the baronial guard.

Be it known that We, Roak, King by right of arms, and Elizabeth, Our Queen, are minded to make unto James Edgarson an Award of Arms in recognition of his service to Ealdormere, specifically for resurrecting Skraeling Althing’s Baronial Guard. We bestow upon him the right to bear arms within the Society for Creative Anachronism without let or hindrance from any person, and the rights and responsibilities conveyed by his elevation to this rank. Done this [Date] day of [Month], A.S. [Year], while sitting on Our thrones in Our [Place name], in testimony whereof We have set Our hand and seal.

Based on Gunnlaug’s drapa about King Sigtrygg Silk-beard, in the Saga of Gunnlaug Serpent-Tongue, circa 1270-1300, as translated in The Sagas of the Icelanders, Viking Press, 2000.

I know which offspring,
Descendent if kings,
I want to proclaim
--Kvaran’s son is his name;
It is his habit
To be quite lavish:
The poet’s ring of gold
He surely won’t withhold.



Adelaide de Lyon, AOA, 2012

Sweet love of singing,
Voice blossoming in vocal decorations,
You honour us,
With the gift of your song.

Be it known that We, Roak, King by right of arms, and Elizabeth, Our Queen, are minded to make unto Adelaide de Lyon an Award of Arms in recognition of her skills and service to Ealdormere, specifically for her choral singing and assisting with the running of events. Therefore, We bestow upon her the right to bear arms within the Society without let or hindrance from any person, and the rights and responsibilities conveyed by her elevation to this rank. Done this [Date] day of [Month], A.S. [Year], while sitting on Our Lupine Thrones in Our [Place name], in testimony whereof We have set Our hand and seal.

Based on Dulcis amica Dei (Anonymous), circa 15th century.

Dulcis amica Dei,
rosa vernans stella decora
Tu memor esto mei
Dum mortis venerit hora

Sweet love of God,
roses blossoming star decorations
You remember me
While death is the time comes


Willmar Grimsdyke, AOA, 2012

I heard tell
Of Wilmar’s deeds      in all the arts
Heraldry and calligraphy        to name but two
Pursuivant and archer        sewer of garb
Made ready his garments        girded on sword
Wilmar, the bold         in all that he does

Be it known that We, Roak, King by right of arms, and Elizabeth, Our Queen, are minded to make unto Willmar Grimsdyke an Award of Arms in recognition of his service to the Ealdormere, specifically for his duties as pursuivant. We bestow upon him the right to bear arms within the Society for Creative Anachronism without let or hindrance from any person, and the rights and responsibilities conveyed by his elevation to this rank. Done this [Date] day of [Month], A.S. [Year], while sitting on Our thrones in Our [Place name], in testimony whereof We have set Our hand and seal.

Based on The Lay of Hildebrand (Das Hildebrandslied), circa 830. Text from Wilhelm Braune, ed, Althochdeutsches Lesebuch, 14th ed. (Tübingen: Max Niemeyer Verlag, 1962, p. 84.) Originally prepared and translated by Douglas Simms; edited by Jonathan Slocum.

Ik gihorta ðat seggen
ðat sih urhettun        ænon muotin
Hiltibrant enti Haðubrant        untar heriun tuem
sunufatarungo        iro saro rihtun
garutun se iro guðhamun        gurtun sih iro suert ana
helidos ubar hringa        do sie to dero hiltiu ritun

I heard tell
That warriors met        in single combat
Hildebrand and Hadubrand        between two armies
son and father        prepared their armour
made ready their battle garments        girded on their swords
the warriors, over their ring mail        when they rode to battle.



Aurelia Gabriana - Scarlet Banner 2012

Today the Wolf recognizes the champion archer
And today the populace cheers her skill.
Barons and Ladies sing her praise;
Led by the bow, in lands close and far.
For among us there is
A yeoman worthy of a banner red.

So, see, read, hear, know and understand by these presents that We, Roak and Elizabeth, King and Queen of these Trillium lands of Ealdormere, do wish to recognize the skill in archery which Aurelia has displayed, specifically in shooting at the range on her own lands, on that of the Canton of Petrea Thule, and for being named one of our kingdom’s five representatives on the Archery Champions team at the Pennsic War. For this do We now commend her]and bestow upon her Our Award of the Scarlet Banner and the right to bear the badge of the award. Done while sitting upon Our thrones in Our [group hosting event] at [event] this [day] day of [month], anno societatis [year], in testimony whereof We have set Our hands and seal.


Based on CANTICLES ON THE PERSON OF CHRIST by St. Romanos Melodos (c. 550 A.D.) Translated from Greek to English by Michael Covington

The Nativity (Canticle 1)
Today the Virgin gives birth to the Heavenly One
And today the earth shelters the Unapproachable One.
Angels and shepherds sing His praise;
Led by the star, wise men make their way.
For unto us is born
A newborn boy, from before all time God



Graeme de Liste of Cherbourg - Scarlet Banner

On the archery range, toe by the line
there is a man of Normandy refined.
There shoots an archer from far away France;
his bow is steady, his arrows precise.
His carriage is noble, bearing so fine.
A champion he is, this Graeme de Liste.

Let it be known that We, Roak and Elizabeth, King and Queen of the Lupine Lands of Ealdormere, do wish to recognize the skill in archery exhibited by Graeme de Liste of Cherbourg in lands home and abroad, most specifically for being one of Ealdormere’s archery champions at Pennsic in the Debated Lands. So do we commend him and bestow upon him Our Award of the Scarlet Banner and the right to bear the badge of the award. Done while sitting Our thrones in Our [hosting group] at [event] this [day] day of [month], anno societatus [year], in testimony whereof We have set Our hands and seal.

Based on the Chanson de Roland, 12th century.

Desuz un pin, delez un eglanter
Un faldestoed i unt, fait tout d'or mer:
La siet li reis ki dulce France tient.
Blanche ad la barbe et tut flurit le chef,
Gent ad le cors et le cuntenant fier.
S'est kil demandet, ne l'estoet enseigner.

Under a pine tree, by a rosebush,
there is a throne made entirely of gold.
There sits the king who rules sweet France;
his beard is white, with a full head of hair.
He is noble in carriage, and proud of bearing.
If anyone is looking for the King, he doesn't need to be pointed out.



Meuric Whith, Award of the Scarlet Banner, 2012

Men went to Pennsic, mead-nourished,
Stalwart and strong, needs must I praise them.
Amid battle blades a Welshman stands strongly,
Eager his sword thirst and skilled is his shield.
Of Meuric Whith my voice gives to praising,
Able at arts of peace time and war.
Filled with bright honour, steadfast, courageous,
Swift in the struggle, word-praise his blessing.
This brave one, deserving of King’s recognition,
This son of the northlands, this glorious one.

Be it known that We, King Edward and Queen Rylyn, do bestow upon Meuric Whith an Award of the Scarlet Banner for his prowess in battle and love of all things martial.

Done by Our hand this [XX] day of [XX], Anno Societatis XLVII, while upon our Lupine Thrones at the Pennsic War.

Based on Y Gododdin (stanza IX), from the Book of Aneirin, 13th century, as reproduced in Canu Aneirin (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1938).

Men went to Catraeth, mead-nourished,
Sturdy and strong, it would be wrong should I not praise them.
Amid blood-red blades in dark-blue sockets,
The war-hounds fought fiercely, tight formation.
Of the war-band of Brennych, I would have thought it a burden,
to leave any in the shape of a man alive.
A friend I have lost; faithful I was.
Swift in the struggle, it grieves me to leave him.
The brave one desired no father-in-law’s dowry,
The son of Cian from Maen Gwyngwn.




Gina Dragoni, Award of the Orion, 2013

Eternal omnipotent Majesties, in whom the sole hope of the realm is,
Of Ealdormere in the Heavens are thou, our Protector:
Consider, we pray Thee, Thy people, one in particular,
Look at her works lest You be denied the sight of this artisan’s works;
There where Athena commands, Gina creates clothing
Of the most resplendent quality.
O most beneficent rulers, may’st Thou graciously please to ordain her
That, through the records of heralds and scribes,
And through the realms of the Society, her work will be known,
By granting her Your Award of the Orion.

We hear your words and swear it will be done,
An Orion to Gina is given, where the Hare Feasts this day,
In Our Canton of Caldrithig, where all the people have gathered.
Thus We do, in our Society’s forty-eighth year,
On the feast day of St. Victorinus.

By THLaird Colyne Stewart, based on The Golden Bull of the Emperor Charles IV 1356 A.D.

Eternal, omnipotent God, in whom the sole hope of the world is,
Of Heaven the Maker Thou, of earth, too, the lofty Creator:
Consider, we pray Thee, Thy people, and gently, from out Thy high dwelling
Look down lest they turn their steps to the place where Erinis is ruler;
There where Allecto commands, Megaera dietetic the measures
But rather by virtue of him, this emperor Charles whom Thou lovest
O most beneficent God, may'st Thou graciously please to ordain it
That, through the pleasant glades of forests ever in flower,
And through the realms of the bless'd, their pious leader may bring them
I nto the holy shades, where the heavenly waters will quicken
The seeds that were sown in the life, and where the ripe crops are made glorious
Cleansed in supernal founts from all of the thorns they have gathered.
Thus may the harvest be God's, and great may its worth be in
future
Heaping a hundred fold the corn in the barns overflowing..


Inga, Olaf's wife, Award of Arms, 2012

I am quick to sing
A worthy one’s praises,
But will not speak
About misers;
Freely I speak
Of good deeds
So I cannot stay silent
About this Ealdormerean

Inga, Olaf’s wife,
Paragon of women,
Who served this kingdom
At the Pennsic War:
Royalty’s friend,
Who toiled long
In the heat and rain
Of the Debated Lands.

Be it known that We, Edward, King by right of arms, and Rylyn, Our Queen, are minded to make unto Inga, Olaf’s wife, an Award of Arms in recognition of her service to the kingdom of Ealdormere, specifically for work done at the Pennsic War. We bestow upon her the right to bear arms within the Society for Creative Anachronism without let or hindrance from any person, and the rights and responsibilities conveyed by her elevation to this rank. Done this 1st day of September, A.S. XLVII, while sitting on Our thrones in Our Shire of Brennistein Vatn, at Baron’s Howe, in testimony whereof We have set Our hand and seal.

Based on Egil’s praise poem for Arinbjorn, Egil’s Saga, Chapter 80, verses 1 and 11, circa 1220, as trans. in The Sagas of Icelanders, Viking, 1997.

1.         I am quick to sing
A noble man’s praises.
But stumble for words
About misers;
Freely I speak
Of a king’s deeds.
But stay silent
About the people’s lies.

11.       Arinbjorn,
            Paragon of men,
            Who lifted me alone
            Above the king’s anger:
            The king’s friend,
            Who never told untruth
            In the warlike
            Ruler’s hall.



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